Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)

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Native Americans used the red sap from the root as body paint. The rhizomes contain the alkaloid sanguinarine which is known for antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties. Research indicates that sanguinarine may also offer protection against skin cancer. However the FDA considers Bloodroot unsafe even in small doses. I also do not support wild-crafting. Please enjoy the beauty and help protect our native plants.

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Author: Cedar Creek Adventures

I began my study of plants as a child from my Grandmother, Rosa Leatherman and have continued the study of native plants. I have attended classes at Tom Brown Jr. Tracker School, Earth Walk Northwest by Karen Sherwood and the Herbal Healer Academy by Dr. Marijah McCain. I am a member of the Arkansas Native Plant Society and served as Secretary for 4 years. I have been co-owner of Cedar Creek Nature Studies and taught many classes on wild edible and medicinal plants. I make my own soaps and lotions share would love to share my knowledge with you.

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